Culture and Community Researchers’ Network, March 2011

Presenters:
Isabel Jackson, PhD candidate, the Australian Centre of The School of History and Philosophical Studies. University of Melbourne
I am, you are … but who are they and why are they looking at us like that?
Georgia Birch, PhD candidate, Deakin University
How does previous physical activity and motherhood influence activity levels in later life for older Somali women living in Melbourne, Australia?


Georgia Birch, PhD candidate, Deakin University
How does previous physical activity and motherhood influence activity levels in later life for older Somali women living in Melbourne, Australia?

The arts were used as a communicative tool for participants to establish rapport and relationships with the researcher and allowed time and development of the narrative processes.

This PhD undertakes a qualitative analysis of how previous physical activity and the role of motherhood influence activity levels in Somalia women over 65 years of age. The arts were used as a communicative tool for participants to establish rapport and relationships with the researcher and allowed time and development of the narrative processes. This in turn established themes and outcomes that can be used to implement culturally appropriate physical activity interventions for this group.

Georgia’s background has always been in the sports science field having been a Physical Educator in the public and private system and then a health promotion lecturer at Australian Catholic University. Her Masters in Women’s Health was with older Australian women and the effects of exercise on their physical and mental health. She is currently involved with older women from CALD communities and is very interested in gathering information using community arts based programs.

Isabel Jackson, PhD candidate, the Australian Centre of The School of History and Philosophical Studies. University of Melbourne
I am, you are … but who are they and why are they looking at us like that?

The role of arts in community based cultural identity – developed from observations and unanswered questions that arose in her own experience as an arts practitioner and in arts administration, education and management

The spectre of ‘the other’ is a familiar concept in discussions about, well, seemingly everything involving human attitudes, especially in areas of identity and where it brushes against attitudes of racism, nationalism and multiculturalism.  Whether framed as enticingly exotic, as banal and dross, or sinisterly malevolent the other is figured commonly as a means of differentiating ‘us’.  In this sense it is self-reflective.  This presentation will explore aspects and practices of othering within a CCD paradigm from variable ‘us’ bases, and where they might be envisioned as a means to create a pluralist society.  The considerations posed in the presentation represent points of departure for my PhD research in to the role of the arts in community based cultural identity as it is facilitated via CCD projects.

Isabel is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne, in the Australian Centre of The School of History and Philosophical Studies.  The research topic – the role of arts in community based cultural identity – developed from observations and unanswered questions that arose in her own experience as an arts practitioner and in arts administration, education and management.