Culture and Community Researchers’ Network, June 2011

Presenters:
Dr. Andrea Lemon, Creative Director of Cha Cha Sam and Kids Thrive
This Place has No Place: Traditional Circus, Community and Belonging
Adam Broinowski, University of Melbourne
In search of commonalities in multiple sovereignties: a discussion of intercultural and multilingual performance collaborations in Cardiff, Dili, Jordan, Tokyo


Thursday 2 June, 3.30-5.30pm

This Place has No Place: Traditional Circus, Community and Belonging
Dr. Andrea Lemon, Creative Director of Cha Cha Sam and Kids Thrive

In this paper I draw on oral history interviews with over 50 elderly traditional circus artists and proprietors, and participant observation undertaken travelling with traditional circuses through Queensland, NSW and South Australia, to examine the notion of circus¹ as place¹, and the ways in which nomadic circus people express a sense of community and belonging disconnected from geographic place.

Dr. Andrea Lemon is a highly awarded author, researcher, scriptwriter, director and curator. Her recent doctoral thesis – Tough as Buggery: Australian Circus, Community and Belonging, was undertaken as a partnership with the Australian Centre of the University of Melbourne, and the Performing Arts Collection of the Arts Centre, Melbourne. She is Creative Director of two companies – Cha Cha Sam and Kids Thrive – researching, developing and producing arts-based CCD programmes, performances and resources for kids and communities in collaboration with specialists working in early literacy, disability, family violence and social justice.

More information about Andrea Lemon’s work including her PhD

In search of commonalities in multiple sovereignties: a discussion of intercultural and multilingual performance collaborations in Cardiff, Dili, Jordan, Tokyo
Adam Broinowski, University of Melbourne

Adam Broinowski has recently submitted a PhD at the Centre for Ideas and the School of Philosophical and Historical Studies, University of Melbourne on the Japanese aesthetic history of the body from the post-war to the present. A writer and researcher based in Melbourne, he has lived and worked in Japan intermittently since 1984. For over a decade, he worked as a professional theatre and filmmaker, making his own productions and touring with leading Australian theatre companies. While a research fellow at the University of Tokyo, Department of Cultural Representation (2003-2005), he was a core performer with a Tokyo-based Japanese experimental theatre company. He has published several essays and chapters in peer-reviewed journals and books, and will be embarking on post-doctoral research soon.

2011 Program – the Culture & Community Researchers’ Network